What I Tasted On My Summer Vacation

Just kidding:  retired doctors don’t take vacations!  But we did just return from a week in Madrid and San Sebastian, followed by a week visiting chateaus in Bordeaux.  Although there were lots of great-tasting solids (jamon iberico de bellota, foie gras, Charolais beef, raw-milk Epoisses, mmm), this posting is going to be about Bordeaux wines.  If you have no interest at all in wine, my apologies; this would be a good place to exit- thanks!

Tasting barrel samples of 2016 red Bordeaux was fabulous; the vintage really does live up to all the hype.  If you have a wine collection, I would recommend buying some 2016s: even at $25 or less, some wines are already very appealing (Chateau Potensac from the Medoc, for example) and have the potential to develop well for five to fifteen years.  At the other end of the spectrum, wines such as Ch. Mouton-Rothschild or Ch. Margaux lie in the stratosphere, with regard to quality and price, and can age for decades.  Ch. Leoville-Las-Cases, for me, was their equal in quality for half the price.  If you have a special event to commemorate yearly, such as a wedding in 2016, you’re in luck!

One good thing about this vintage is that the wines reflected their respective communes:  that is, a wine from St. Julien had the typical taste and style of that commune, and not, say, Pomerol or St. Emilion.  In my opinion, this typicity doesn’t happen every year.  To generalize:  a typical red from St. Estephe tends to be heavy-ish, somewhat monolithic, linear and powerful.  A Pauillac tends to be more nuanced, although still sturdy, with graphite notes (think pencil shavings) and tobacco, like a cigar box.  Pauillac’s immediate neighbor to the south, St. Julien, makes wines quite similar, but more supple and round, and I find India ink notes, as well as overt fruitiness, in St. Juliens more than in Pauillacs- both in the nose and flavor.  Wines from Margaux tend to be more delicate/elegant, with a famous floral (violets) aroma.  Graves often have a mineral, smoky character.  St. Emilions and Pomerols are often fleshy, plump and rich from a high percentage of Merlot; whether they are grown on limestone (St. Emilion) or clay/gravel (Pomerol) affects the flavor.  From years of comparing these, it becomes possible to identify the commune, or even the producer, in a blind tasting, which is a pretty good bar trick.  But I’ve only listed general tendencies; there can be huge differences in style between two chateaus located in the same commune.

By the way, these taste characteristics are not the same as the spurious and fanciful descriptions often provided by wine writers, who might argue with one another as follows:  “I taste mangoes!”  “Mangoes?  You’re crazy; it’s pineapple.”  “That’s right, pineapple!  And coconut!”  “Yeah, just like the pina colada I had before dinner!”

In science fiction, it can get even more obscure.  Here’s an excerpt from Fourth World, in which Benn Marr attends a wine tasting at Mellon College:

And so it went, for four other wines.  Dr. Neelin described esthetic and geologic elements: earthy forest or mushroom; the smell of rain falling on hot stones; delicate floral scents; the tang of iron, like a bloody nose; roasted coffee beans, licorice, chocolate, berries of various colors; the mineral effect of a steep, rocky slope; a summer plagued by hailstorms; or a long hot spell before harvest.  And, though it seemed far-fetched, even as Dr. Neelin described the historical context of each wine- the influence of an ancient monastic order, or the personality of an eccentric winemaker- Benn detected traces of each element.  He imagined some sort of ambient energy field interacting with the water content, imprinting all of this data into the structure- the hexagonal, square and triangular formations- of each wine.  It was like the electronic translation of sound or sight into a recording (not so different from the volumes of data previously recorded in ancient tapes, plastic phonograph records, or metal discs; and now the micro-crystalline core of his datadisc) which could be heard or seen again, and replayed endlessly, if only one had the diamond-tipped needle, the laser, the ability to translate the data in reverse.

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China On The Rise

Last night, Harvard Prof. Graham Allison gave a talk, moderated by former Rep. Ellen Tauscher, at the Commonwealth Club in SF.  The topic was his new book, Destined for War:  Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?  Five centuries BC, Thucydides noted that the threat from a rising power, Athens, as perceived by Sparta- the ruling power in ancient Greece- led to the Peloponnesian War.  He drew a parallel with US/China relations- acknowledging some of the shortcomings of such a comparison, which have been amply pointed out in various reviews of the book.  China, he said, has caught up with the US in every major parameter, and surpassed it in some.  For example, when Reagan was president, China’s GDP was 10% that of the US, and now it is 110%.  In many aspects of technology, China is taking the lead:  social media, AI, robotics, clean energy, electric vehicles etc.  The US still leads by far in the military arena, but China may not care as much as we suppose (Allison reminded us that, when US and South Korean troops once pushed back a North Korean invasion almost to the Chinese border, China used conventional weapons to fight the sole nuclear power on Earth, all the way down to the 38th parallel).  Economic “warfare” is just as important these days, and as the US withdraws from the world stage (see TPP), you have to wonder:  which country now represents Sparta, and which Athens?  Sharing common interests- such as avoiding nuclear holocaust and preventing global warming- lowers the risk of war, but then having a belligerent and unpredictable president who denigrates NATO and pulls out of the Paris Accord weakens those commonalities.  It seems to me that under our Chaos President, fear of “Mutual Assured Destruction” (MAD) and climate change may not be enough to prevent war.  Also, the strong chauvinism and national fervor among Chinese- not mentioned in the talk- may tilt the balance towards war when a crisis erupts, for example on the Korean Peninsula or South China Sea.  As I pointed out in an earlier blog (A Day Without Women), the world is a lot more complicated now, but Thucydides may be right after all.

Here’s an excerpt from my sci-fi novel Fourth World, in which Chou Xia-Yu, leader of the world government in 2196, ponders the fate of expatriate anomaly Benn Marr:  will he have to be destroyed?

Chou silently nodded his satisfaction at the inherent justice of it all:  descendants of the American colonists on Mars had paid a steep price to atone for the imperialist policies of their ancestors.  And now, he speculated, this Benn Marr represented another level of reward for years of experimentation.  The ability to read and to project thoughts was similar to what Chinese monks (particularly in the Tibetan District) had been practicing for a thousand years.  The difference was that Eunigen had given Benn his abilities by modifying his genes, so that they could be passed on to future generations in large numbers:  the hypothetical implications for the PWE were staggering!  Unfortunately, Benn Marr, although of Chinese descent, had lost touch with his ethnic roots on Mars, and had no understanding of his rich cultural heritage.  As with all traditional Chinese, Leader Chou harbored the conviction that the Chinese civilization had greater value- it was simply superior- and should be promoted above all others; Benn was unlikely to feel such loyalty.